Youth Football Drills That Can Be Practiced Alone

When you have a passion for something, you want to pursue it at every available moment. Whether you’re a football coach looking for some practice strategies to assign to your players, a parent looking to give your kid a step up, or a player who loves the game and wants to improve, we’ve come up with some youth football drills that can be practiced alone. Every youth football player should learn to throw and catch the ball properly even if their position doesn’t require it on a regular basis.

Passing Drills That Can Be Practiced Alone

  • Practice throwing a spiral. Focus on your grip technique as well as your release. Practice at 50% of your throwing power and just concentrate on throwing perfect spirals. The football should roll off the fingers putting a spin on the ball.

     

  • Once you get the spiral down begin to develop accuracy. Again, keep your drills to half speed and focus on achieving the highest accuracy rating. Get a notebook to keep records in and try to improve each time out.

     

  • Once you can throw a perfect spiral at a target on a consistent basis you can begin to increase the power in your throws. Increase the velocity by 10% or so until you obtain the same accuracy rating you achieved at 50% capacity.

     

  • Now its time to throw while you’re moving to simulate game activity. Practice throwing from the pocket, rolling out, backpedaling to avoid the rush, throwing in the opposite direction…essentially, get ready for all game conditions.

Get plenty of rest for your arm. The problem with practicing repetitive activities is that they can cause ligament and muscle strain. Practicing football passing drills alone two or three alternate days a week is plenty.

Receiving Drills That Can Be Practiced Alone

  • Practice running your routes for each play. Drill these into your subconscious mind. Simulate game action and bring your hands up for the catch while forming a “pocket” with your fingers.

     

  • As a receiver it is important for you to practice “watching the ball into your hands” so that it becomes second nature. To practice this alone, lie on your back and spiral the ball a few feet into the air. Then “watch” the ball right into your hands. Be sure to form a pocket with your hands with your thumbs and index fingers almost touching. Catch the football away from your body and then tuck it in.

Of course, you can perform agility and conditioning drills alone as well. Every youth football player should be taught the self-discipline to exercise. Try these youth football drills whenever you can and watch your game improve.

You can also find many youth football drills on the Internet covering passing, receiving, rushing, defense and more Some drills are free and some require subscription or for you to order a DVD. Free football drills allow you greater flexibility in trying a variety and see what works best for you as the coach and your youth baseball team. Always remember that drills should be age appropriate. The right passing drill for a 14 year-old boy will not suit and 8-year old and vice versa.

There are many football coaching resources and communities like Weplay available to help with any questions you might have. Don’t underestimate the passion of the community around you. We are all here to help the kids.